IJARP
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International Journal of Advanced Research and Publications

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Health Implications On Technology Usage Among College Students

Volume 2 - Issue 8, August 2018 Edition
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Author(s)
Aaron Carlo C. Decendario
Keywords
Health Implications, Technology, College Students
Abstract
This study aimed to determine the demographic profiles, general technology usage and health implications on technology usage among college students. A descriptive design was utilized to describe the demographic profiles, general technology usage and its health implications among college students. Frequency, percentile and weighted mean were used for statistical treatment. Developmental design was used for the development of Health Implication on Technology Usage Program. Findings of the study revealed that age bracket of 18-19 obtained the highest percentage of 54.44 while the lowest was the age bracket of 24-25 which obtained 3.33 percent. The gender showed that females comprised of 58.89% while males comprised only of 41.11%. In terms of course taken by the respondents, BSEd obtained the highest percentage of 21.66%, while the lowest comprised of BSCS, BSRE and BSBio with a percentage of 1.11. The data also revealed that their parent’s income ranges of P 20,001-30,000 got the highest percentage of 41.66 while the lowest was the parent’s income ranges of P 80,000 and above which obtained 2.78 percent. In overall result, the medium of use among college students has a weighted mean of 2.88 which is high in extent. The extent of usage for the purpose of use among college students has a weighted mean of 2.95 which is high in extent. The extent of usage for technological programs among college students has a weighted mean of 2.06 which is moderate in extent. And the extent of usage for technological applications among college students has a weighted mean of 3.56 which is very high in extent. However, the health implications among college students in the use of technology has a weighted mean of 3.16 which is moderately caused health implications. From the data analysis, conclusions were drawn that most of the respondents belongs to the age bracket of 18-19 years old and mostly are females with parent’s monthly income of P 20,000-30,000 per month. The use of cellphones has highest usage among college students. College students spend class assignments, class projects and personal matters to at least 4-5 hours a day. The use technological programs of MS word have the highest use among college students. Social media, Internet, communication and multimedia paralleled in terms of highest usage among college students. And Sleep-rest pattern has the highest problem among college students. The researcher then recommends that there is a need to adapt the Short Course Program on Health Implications of Technology and the need to the college students to prevent possible health implications from over-usage of technology. There is a need to embed the Health Implications on Technology Usage Program to the Personal Growth Session and teachers of the Notre Dame of Dadiangas University may utilize other technology applications to create virtual leaning and enhance teaching learning process to students. Lastly, future researchers may evaluate the implementation of the Short Course Program on Health Implications of Technology and conduct similar studies on the areas of technology addiction and academic performance among college students.
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