IJARP SJIF(2018): 4.908

International Journal of Advanced Research and Publications!

Measurement Of Student Learner’s Attribute In Online Collaborative Problem Solving Using Social Network Analysis

Volume 3 - Issue 3, March 2019 Edition
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Author(s)
Jesus S. Paguigan, Melvin A. Ballera
Keywords
Betweenness, Closeness, Centrality, Degree
Abstract
Social network analysis offers a unique way for teacher to visualize collaboration and communication within a course and see relationships between individuals, groups or teams. The researcher used social network analysis to the growth of collaboration in class which focuses on the structure properties of network such as degree of centrality, betweenness centrality, closeness centrality, sociogram and how it related to performance of the students. In general, the SNA enable the researcher to understand how the individual students are connected within a network. In the class, teamwork plays an important role in education, aiming for developing a set of skills only achievable through social interaction. Data showed that there is a significant difference between the student collaborative problem solving in pre-test score and post-test using social network analysis. The students performed better in the post test after a week of collaboration which were administered. This means that the proposed study is beneficial to elevate the scores of students in the teamwork and exchanging of information and ideas in chatroom. The research measured the acceptability of the proposed study to help the student to elevate their proficiency level in communication and interesting in contribution of knowledge in the group, and to see their relationship to other students. Therefore, the ability of problem solving in this research study using measurement of student learner’s attribute in online collaborative problem solving using social network analysis depicts the ability of students to use teamwork or collaboration and to use connection of ideas or knowledge across networks. The Increasing ability of problem solving of students as a whole was seen from the average score of pretest and posttest results.
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